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In May 2011, our Kenmore clothes dryer stopped working. We called Sears for service. We were "upsold" a service package that included not only the repair but an extended warranty – something we usually do not purchase.

We made it clear when we booked the service, and we made it clear to your technician when he arrived, that the dryer had been moved out of its usual position to make working on it easier, and that he would need to reconnect the exhaust tube that vents the hot, wet dryer exhaust to the outdoors. At first, he claimed that there was no need to vent an electric clothes dryer to the outdoors because there were no combustion products in the exhaust. That was a very bad piece of advice. Unvented, the dryer would fill the cellar with hot, wet air every time it was used – an unhealthy condition that would promote mold, mildew, and structural timber rot. We insisted on having the exhaust tube reconnected to the outdoors and he agreed to do so.

We then left the Sears technician to do his work in the cellar. From the sound of it, he spent most of his time getting instructions for the repair on his cell phone. We then heard him leave through the side door. The next thing we knew, we received a phone call on the house line. It was the technician, calling from his truck, stating that the repair was done. Before we could go downstairs and look at his work, he had driven off. We went downstairs and found that he had left the dryer running, on a high setting, with no vent to the outside – it was spewing warm air into the cellar. He had left the access plate – the white enameled steel plate that affixes to the front of the dryer below the door and conceals the dryer's works – off, not having troubled himself to re-attach it. When we called Sears to get a technician back to complete the job, we were told to try reconnecting it ourselves, and given an appointment many days off, leaving us without a working dryer for an even longer period.

I did manage to reconnect the dryer myself, with no small expenditure in time and effort. A competent technician would likely have done the job much quicker, and more easily.

The technician did not leave a work order or any other scrap of paper regarding the job or his identity. I can't image that is an approved practice – it may even be unlawful.

Under the circumstances, when we got the charge invoice we asked Sears to cancel its invoice for $207.57. Sears responded in writing – the charge was canceled, and we owed nothing. We thought Sears had lived up to its obligations, if not in the first instance by doing a proper job of repair, then in the second instance by making good on its failure.

Last week, I received a letter from Sears revoking the credit and telling me I owed the $207.57, and I would need to seek satisfaction from "Protection Agreements". I called the number I was given. Protection Agreements – Sharon – said that if I canceled the agreement, I would owe $292.56 for parts and labor. Sharon said it was possible Sears would consider reversing the $153 labor charge, and charge only for $139.56 for parts, instead of the $207.57, but that would have to come from the technician's manager, and all she could do was to contact him by computer and I would hear from that person by telephone at some unspecified later time, with no promise of a result.

By the time I finished my call with Sharon, I could no longer afford to spend more time and effort trying to get an appropriate result. I have paid Sears in full, without prejudice to my rights to sue.

Review about: Sears Repair.

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Anonymous
#341643

GOOD LUCK, they will send you to their so Called Blue Ribbon Team which is just as much of Joke as all other Customer Service Depts. But since this on Credit maybe you will get better service because they want you to buy more un-serviced and un-warrantied JUNK. Buyer Beware read ALL THE COMPLAINTS ONLINE BEFORE BUYING FROM SEARS AGAIN

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